Turquoise Jewelry

Turquoise jewelry usually reminds people of Native American jewelry. This is because turquoise was one of the materials that Native Americans had available to them. It is also a very bright color and makes for a great piece of jewelry. However, it wasn't only the Native Americans who created and wore turquoise jewelry.

Turquoise has been used for jewelry making since 5500 BC. In Ancient Egypt, turquoise jewelry was worn by some of the most prestigious pharaohs in history.  Queen Zer and King Tut were among the Egyptian royalty whose mummies were discovered to have included turquoise jewelry.

Ancient Aztecs also had an appreciation for Turquoise jewelry. They included turquoise jewelry in their offerings to the Aztec Serpent God. Native Americans have been using turquoise in their jewelry for many years as well. They have been combining silver with their turquoise jewelry since 1880.



Turquoise jewelry has a certain charm to it. Maybe it is the beautiful shade of blue or the fact that not two pieces of turquoise have the same pattern, or maybe the charm is just indefinable. However, many cultures have attributed more than just beauty to turquoise jewelry. Some cultures have believed that turquoise has certain magical properties that can heal the sick or prevent disease.

Turquoise jewelry is a favorite part of many men and women's collections. Turquoise jewelry does require some extra care. This type of stone is softer than other gem stones such as diamonds and rubies. This being the case turquoise jewelry may be more prone to scratching and nicking.

However, removing the piece of turquoise jewelry prior to strenuous activity can prevent accidents from occurring which may mar your piece. Also, Turquoise jewelry should not be washed with soap and you should avoid contact with grease as well. Cleaning machines are not a good idea either.

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