Tribal Music

There are numerous Native American tribes living within the borders of the United States. Hence, there are many forms of tribal music. If you are unfamiliar with Native American culture, perhaps you have never heard of tribal music. Every group of people has songs and dances which reflect their culture and traditions. Native Americans are no exception. Although tribal music is often associated with a type of folk music, Native Americans have varying music taste, thus their tribal music is influenced by practically every genre including rock, hip hop, blues, etc.

For tribal music to be harmonious, the Native American Indians use a variety of instruments to create distinct beats and sounds. For example, the Indian drum and flutes are commonly used instruments. In fact, the Indians have their own flute. The Native American flute is very unique because it is crafted with two air chambers. Together, both chambers produce a melodic sound quite different from ordinary flutes. Along with using musical instruments to produce tribal music, various Native American tribes enjoy singing and performing with the music. Singing may consist of group vocals or solo performances accompanied with tribal dancing.



Fortunately, you do not have to live on an Indian reservation to enjoy tribal music. Authentic tribal music is available on compact disc or downloadable from the internet. Because Native American Indian music has a captivating melody that is sure to have listeners bobbing their heads, it’s perfect for all music lovers. Moreover, Indian-Americans will also appreciate the various styles of tribal music readily accessible.

Again, tribal music is available in many different music genres. Therefore, regardless of whether your music taste is modern or classic, there is a style of tribal music to complement your listening ear. Moreover, tribal music includes sounds that are unique to individuals Indian tribes.

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