Tribal Dance

Tribal dance is common among the Native American Indians and reflects their varying styles and music taste. Tribal dance is not a cultural marking branded by the Indians. In fact, several groups across the globe have unique and distinct tribal dances.

This includes groups that reside in Africa, Morocco, India, etc. Tribal dance is primary used as a form of entertainment. However, these dances are also common during ceremonies and rituals. Moreover, there are several variations of tribal dance. In fact, one common dance that is rooted in tribal dance is belly dancing.



Different types of tribal dance include classical Indian dancing, ceremonial dancing, folk dancing, fancy dancing, and sacred dancing. A ceremonial tribal dance is extremely popular. This particular dance generally occurs during any sort of ceremony or ritual. Ceremonies might include weddings and other popular celebrations that are common among the tribe. Fancy dancing is another popular tribal dance that was created by the Lakota tribe. This form of dance often required performers to dress in formal attire. In addition to dancing for entertainment, some forms of tribal dance are also a competitive sport among Native American Indians.

Tribal dance consists of a unique dance style. Some forms of tribal dance may be difficult to master. Yet, there are many dance studios that train individuals in the art and skill of tribal dance. The majority of these dance courses are taught by Native American Indians. These are perfect for Americans who want to learn various dance styles, and Indian-Americans who want to stay connected to their roots.

In addition to learning various tribal dances, it may be possible to observe Native American Indians in action. There are many Indian dance groups which tour throughout the country. These tribal dancers perform intricate dance moves that are typical of various Indian tribes.

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