Sioux Weapons

Bows used as Sioux Weapons Sioux weapons consisted of the use of bows and arrows. A double curved bow was used as Sioux weapons by the Sioux Indians. These bows were prepared according to the length of each archer. Sioux weapons measurement was done by measuring according to the archers left arm which is stretched outward parallel with the ground. The bows length measures from the left center finger to the right outside hip at the joint. Unlike other Indian weapons, Sioux weapons were said to not have been sinew backed which many Native Americans felt made their weapons stronger and safer. Sioux weapons such as bows were also assumed to have been made out of Green Ash.

Arrows used as Sioux Weapons The arrows they used were made of wood. Sioux arrows were measured from the tip of the center finger to elbow on the right arm and wrist to the point where the hand joins the center finger. These were all combined to give the arrow its over all length. Sioux Indians used stone, bone, and sinew arrowheads to make their Sioux arrows. However, they also used steel as soon as they were able to trade for it.



Some other Sioux weapons consists of a sinew backed horn bow from Montana which was 3 feet in length, rectangular in cross section and made from a cow horn join at the center with fasteners. This Sioux bow is double curved and has red flannel at the handle and at the curves in the limbs. The bow string is a customary 3 ply sinew string.

Dakota Bow Another Sioux bow weapon referred to as a Dakota bow is made from Hickory. This Dakota bow is double curved, narrowing toward the tips. There are two notches at one end and one at the other. The bow string for the Dakota bow is made from 2 ply sinew cord and the bow is 3 feet and 7 inches in length.

Dakota Sioux Arrows are approximately 24 to 27 inches in length. They are banded with reds and blues stripes. They are made from Osier and sinew as well.

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