Palomino Horses

Palomino horses have a colorful history that can be traced, in many instances, back to the time of the Crusades.  A beautiful horse of golden color, they were often the revered choice of steed for many royal leaders. In fact, Palomino horses were so favored that they often appeared in paintings and other cultural artifacts throughout history. 

It was Queen Isabella from Spain who the Native American people can thank for bringing the Palomino to North America. So enraptured by its golden beauty, she wanted the horses to live on and breed and spread throughout the new lands discovered through her financed expeditions.  Back then, the area was in what is now Mexico.  From there, Palomino horses started to make appearances in what are now Texas as well as all throughout the southwestern part of the United States.



It is because of bringing these Palomino horses from Spain to the United States that Native Americans began owning horses.  They caught them in the wild and tamed them.  The horses helped the natives with various aspects of their lives.  They could hunt more effectively on horseback.  The natives could travel more quickly, following the buffalo herds and avoiding harsh seasonal changes.  The horses also helped the natives during war time.

Palomino horses are often pictured as a golden color with a white colored mane and tail.  In fact, Palomino horses can vary in color, from a light gold color all the way to a dark golden shade.  In order to qualify as a Palomino, the main and tail must be a shade of white, ivory or even some silver tones.

These days you can find Palomino horses in different settings from jumping competitions to ranching to rodeos.  They can also be found in racing venues and even in Hollywood! One thing is the same no matter what:  the Palomino horses are an attractive and sturdy and can be used within a number of venues. 

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