Native American Tribe

Life in a Native American tribe has gone through many changes starting with the arrival of white settlers.  The story of any Native American Tribe can not be told without pain, sadness, and regret.  However, the past can not be changed. It can only serve as a reminder of our actions and give us a clear pattern of what not to do in the future.

Life in a Native American Tribe before the arrival of settlers was a relatively peaceful life.  Family and friends were a major part of the Native American life. Children were cherished and relationships were strong.



Another relationship that was important to the Native American tribe was their relationship with nature.  There was always a clear balance between the Native American tribe and the animals, land, and resources around them.  Animals were hunted on an as needed basis.  Every part was used for something and nothing went to waste.  Nature was respected.

Each Native American tribe had their own methods and techniques for various aspects of daily life.  However, new ideas did travel from one Native American tribe to another.  This created an environment where each tribe was able to advance their knowledge and skills through the knowledge of others.

One of the areas where a Native American tribe advanced was in the jewelry and art.  The culture of each Native American tribe was varied but they incorporated the environment around them.  The animals, plants, and landscape dictated the type of art and jewelry that were created by each Native American tribe.  However, the techniques advanced each time one tribe built on the knowledge of another.

Hunting and weapons techniques also advanced. During this time weapons were used for hunting and survival.  At times there may have been conflicts between tribes, but they were not used to the types of all-out battles that would accompany the white man.

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