Native American Tattoos

Many early and primitive people incorporated tattoo art into their societies. This is true of the Native Americans as well as people from the Polynesian and Hawaiian islands. The Native Americans would use objects such as sharpened bone or rock and carve the tattoo into the flesh. The Native American tattoo would then be filled with soot or natural dyes to stain in the wound. There were a variety of reasons why the Native Americans would be tattooed and sometimes, women as well as men would undergo the process. After wars, many men from the winning tribes would often receive a tattoo signifying their conquest and victory.



Different tribes were known by their Native American tattoos. There were different markings to identify different tribes and the regions they were from. Native American tattoos also held mystical or spiritual meanings to those who wore them. Many early people believed that the tattoo would endow them with supernatural powers or strength. Many people took the tattoo of an animal whose strength they wanted to emulate.

Today, many people are opting to identify themselves with Native American tattoos and their tribes. This is true for both those with Native American heritage as well as those who just admire the culture. As tribal art has become more prevalent in today’s society, Native American tattoos are often a popular request for many tattoo artists.

It is advised that if you are a Native American, seeking the tribal art of your ancestors in the form of a tattoo, that you thoroughly research and choose the right one. Many people have mistakenly chosen the wrong symbols and have received tattoos from the wrong tribes. For those who are just interested in receiving Native American tattoos in the forms of Native American faces, eagles, dream catchers, and other symbolic Native American items, there is no need to worry about the authenticity of the tattoo.

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