Native American Tattoos

Native American tattoos are popular among people of Indian descent and non-Indians. Today, there are a variety of tattoo styles available. When choosing tattoos, some young people and adults select a style that is representative of their ancestral roots. Hence, the popularity of Asian, Hispanic, and Native American tattoos.

Tattoos are a major part of Native American culture. Each Indian tribal group has their own purpose for incorporating tattoos. However, the primary reason for tattoos was to identify different tribal groups and grant special powers to its members.



Designing Native American tattoos require a lot of skill. Similar to modern day tattoos, the Native Americans used needles and multiple color dyes for permanent tattoos. Fish bones were often used for needles, and natural dyes supplied the tattoos color. There are specific tribal members trained in the art of tattoo artistry. These experienced tribal members work with much ease. Because of the intricate design of Native American tattoos, the artist must work carefully and very slowly.

There are many beliefs surrounding the use of Native American tattoos. In some tribal groups, tattoos are worn on the face and on different parts of the body. If a member of a tribe was given a permanent tattoo, this person was believed to have great power. Typical tattoos worn by men and women included eagles, mythical creature, feathers, and other animals such as rattle snakes and bears.

Although Native American tattoos are common among Indian, anyone regardless of nationality can obtain a tribal tattoo. If looking for an Indian tribal tattoo with an authentic flare, consider having the tattoo designed by an artist trained in tribal tattoo. Before choosing a design, it may help to browse the various tribal tattoos online. These galleries include a wide assortment of designs for both men and women.

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