Indian Wedding Dresses

Many brides like to consider different dresses for their wedding. The wedding dresses worn by Indians are very different from the western style of wedding dress, yet still lovely. An Indian bride is expected to sparkle on her special day, so the Indian wedding dresses are usually very colorful with intricate designs and embroidery.

Unlike the traditional white usually worn by western brides, the Indian wedding dresses are often red because white is a color of mourning in many areas of the world. Red Indian wedding dresses are considered to be good luck and will bring the couple much happiness.



Because India is so diverse in culture and religion depending on what region you are in, the Indian wedding dresses will vary too. Some common styles used, however, are the sari, gaghra choli, and shalwar chameez. The sari is what many people have already seen Indian women wearing. The cloth is wrapped around the body, either secured by pins or tucked into the waistband. The gaghra is a long skirt and short blouse with a scarf, called a dupatta, draped across the bride’s chest. The shalwar chameez is a long tunic over pants. It too has the dupatta draped across the chest, but the bride can specify that the dupatta be worn around the neck or over the head.

Indian wedding dresses are often a combination of intricate patterns, threading, sequences and beadwork. Some Indian brides with money have their Indian wedding dresses embossed in part with pure gold or silver. The Indian wedding dresses are usually made of a fabric that reflects light well such as satin, silk, or chiffon.

Other accessories are available with Indian wedding dresses. There can never be too many necklaces, bracelets, rings, earrings or hair decorations on an Indian bride. It is all part of the ornamentation of the bride on her wedding day.

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