Indian Weapons

The Native Americans were people of war and Indian weapons were commonplace. Weapons such as bow an arrows, tomahawks, and spears were all part of their early war weapons. As master warriors, many of the earliest forms of Indian weapons were adopted or adapted by the early colonists and settler. These Indian weapons were an important part of each tribe’s fighting style. Native American tribes often fought against each other and then when the early colonists came, many of the wars became focused on driving the white man out of the land.

Arrowheads were the point of arrows and were used by the early Native Americans as well as other primitive peoples. Not only were arrowheads used for war, but also for hunting animals as well. Arrowheads are now considered artifacts and are typically displayed in museums however; many historical enthusiasts are delighted when these tips of arrows are still discovered in modern times. Collectors often purchase arrowheads and build up extensive collections.



Tomahawks are probably the most well known of the Native American weapons. Tomahawks were not only weapons, but they were also used as early tools. Like an axe or hatchet, the Tomahawk was made of wood with metal blades. The Tomahawk was such a powerful tool and weapon, that the United States military began to fashion them. In fact, the Tomahawk was used during the Vietnam War.

Tomahawks were a vital part of early trade. Many of the other tribes would trade furs, gems, and other valuable items in an effort to obtain Tomahawks.

The Native Americans relied heavily upon their weapons and mastering the art of their fighting styles. Tribes were prepared to defend their land, their women, and their children and they were well trained for the task. Though some tribes were very peaceful, other tribes have been remembered for their warrior spirit.





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