Indian Tattoos

Tattoos are very popular today and many people today express an interest in getting Indian tattoos. They find the tribal aspect of the designs very beautiful and powerful. Many Indian tribes have the tradition of getting tribal tattoo art done. Today, many young people find out that their ancestors were part of an Indian tribe and wish to receive Indian tattoos representing that tribe. There are a couple of things to consider before you do this. If you are close to the family member that is of Indian heritage, ask them about your tribe and the Indian tattoos that are associated with that tribe.

Most people do not actually have a direct contact with relatives that are members of a tribe. They may have heard from their parents that a deceased grandparent was part Cherokee. The problem with this is not finding out how the Cherokee used tattoos, but actually knowing that the information is correct. Many people find out that they are not actually affiliated with a tribe after they have received the wrong tribal Indian tattoos. You must remember that tattoos are permanent and once you get them, they are hard and costly to have removed.



You must ask yourself why you are interested in getting Indian tattoos. If you are genuinely interested in being a part of your heritage and honoring the tradition of receiving Indian tattoos, then you want to get the correct tattoo. If you want to get a cool looking tattoo, then you can go on what information you have, whether it is factual or not.

Once you decide to get the tattoo, if you cannot find out exactly what your heritage is, there are a couple of options. You could have a contemporary Indian tattoo designed by a Native American. You could also use the writing systems of tribes such as the Cherokee and Cree. You could get a tattoo of your first initial done in the character from a Native American language.

More on this subject: Indian Tattoos





Related Article Links






American Indian Articles Index | Indigenous Peoples' Literature

Disclaimer: The American Indian Heritage Foundation or Indians.org do not personally endorse or support any of the comments made within the writings of this article.