Indian Symbols

There is a variety of Indian symbols. Even if you are not Native American, you may still be fascinated by the life of the First Nation. Today, a large number of Indians live on reservations throughout North America. However, traces of their culture and heritage are widely visible throughout. For example, Native Americans who've assimilated into American life may have storefront retail stores or online websites that offer a host of Indian artifacts. Authentic Indian merchandise may include clothing, pottery, musical instruments, and so forth. Additionally, a wide selection of merchandise may bear the image of Indian symbols.



Indian symbols include images of the sun, moon, animals, or ancestral tribe members. The Native Americans are very religious, and are inspired by nature. Everything is given deep meaning, and symbols are widely used to help convey their beliefs. For example, there are specific symbols intended to help strengthen one's courage in the face of adversity. Because Indians place a lot of confidence in spirits, they typically wear clothing bearing the symbol of a spirit whenever they seek a blessing. Other symbols include sun symbols, tribe symbols, etc.

The Indian symbols are placed on many different objects. These may be embroidered onto blankets or clothes. Furthermore, certain symbols may be included on tools or hunting equipments. As an example, Indians who seek courage may imprint the courage symbol on bows and arrows. Some tribes create their own symbols. Then again, many symbols are universal. For example, a thunderbird symbol means happiness. A leaf symbolizes wealth, mountains symbolize abundance, and a crossed arrow symbolizes friendships. Other descriptive Indian symbols by and large include a snake which symbolizes wisdom, a rattlesnake's jaw that symbolizes strength, and buffalo's head that symbolizes alertness. Many symbols were also used as part of the Native American's written language.





Related Article Links






American Indian Articles Index | Indigenous Peoples' Literature

Disclaimer: The American Indian Heritage Foundation or Indians.org do not personally endorse or support any of the comments made within the writings of this article.