Indian Rugs

There are numerous artifacts common to Native Americans. Among these include Indian rugs. The American Indians are well known for their ability to handcraft beautiful items. In fact, some museums showcase ancient American Indian products that date back to the discovery of the first nation of North America. Although a large number of Native Americans have adopted an American way of life, there remains a small group of Indians that reside on reservations. These Indians continue to participate in weaving of Indian rugs.

Throughout North America, there are many shops that are devoted to authentic Native American products. Many non-Indians value the hard work that is involved in handcrafting Indian rugs and other Indian products. Indian rugs consist of varying colors and styles. Crafting an authentic Indian rug requires a lot of time and patience. Individuals who have been weaving rugs for many years can usually do so with great ease. On the other hand, less experienced weavers may require more time.



The art of weaving an Indian rug is not something that can be learned overnight. Still, there are many resources available to help Indian Americans and non-Indian weave Indian rugs. Books available offer detail background information about Indian rugs, as well as instructions and a picture guide for designing a unique rug.

Understandably, some may not consider rug weaving a favorite pastime. These individuals may prefer to buy an American Indian rug. There are many imitation Indian rugs. However, if you are looking for an authentic, it helps to stop at an American Indian store owned by Native Americans. Today, many Indians use crafting as a way of earning a living. Thus, it is possible to locate a large assortment of Indian artifacts at these shops. Other favorite Indian products include musical instruments, Indian beadwork, moccasins, blankets, etc.

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