Bead Bracelet

A Native American bead bracelet is a beautiful treasure, especially if it is made by a craftsman working within a tradition passed down for hundreds of years. It is possible to find a bead bracelet or other jewelry produced by an actual Native American, and buying this jewelry will help support Native Americans and will give your items a feel of authenticity.

A typical Native American bead bracelet is made according the design of a particular tribe. Traditionally, beads were made of shell, coral, turquoise, stones, copper, amber, ivory and animal bones and teeth. Glass beads were later introduced to the Continent by European travelers, and became a valued item among Native Americans as it was incorporated into their traditional design. Beads of all kinds were used like currency. Beads were highly valued by Native Americans, and decorated almost every piece of clothing, even moccasins, in addition to being strung together into a bead bracelet.



A typical Native American bead bracelet is made of very small, brightly colored beads arranged in geometrical patterns that are typical of a certain tribe or region. These beads are sewn into hide or another kind of material, and the bead bracelet is tied together at the sides. You can find a bead bracelet with other designs or pictures, such as horses, but many places will sell a Native American bead bracelet in a traditional design.

You can find an authentic Native American bead bracelet on the internet, but ensure that you are getting the real thing. It might be worth it to visit Indian reservations or other places where Native Americans actually live and work to find a bead bracelet, rather than relying on the claims of internet businesses and tourist shops. There are many copies, but nothing quite replaces a genuine Native American bead bracelet.

More on this subject: Beaded Bracelet

 



 

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